Monday, May 25, 2020

May The Dance Be With You: Theresa May Rebuked In Kenya

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by Zulaikha Abiri

Uhuru Kenyatta, Kenyan businessman and the fourth and current president of the Republic of Kenya, made a complaint stating that it had been 30 years since a British Prime Minister visited Kenya. The last to visit before Theresa May was Margaret Thatcher back in 1988. He delivered this diplomatic rebuke to Theresa May at a Joint press in the state house in Nairobi Kenya.  This was also the final day of her visit to the continent. Kenyatta was later asked about an agreement to allow stolen funds in Britain to be returned to Kenyato fund health, education and other development projects. As the Kenyan President answered this, he seemed to have forgotten the former foreign secretary’s name. He said:

“Last year, if you recall – then Boris, erm, Boris Johnson- the bicycle guy….Boris Johnson was here with ambulances… These ambulances were bought courtesy of funds that had been seized, returned and utilized to buy ambulances which were distributed across the country ”.

The prime minister gave a wry smile as Uhuru struggled to recall Johnson’s name.

Earlier on her trip, May made a reference to the former’s Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson’s visit to Africa as an example of U.K’s commitment to the continent. Though Johnson had resigned as foreign secretary last month due to a dispute over May’s plans for Brexit.

The President hoped there will be more visits, despite the long gap between the Prime Minister’s visits. He adds: “Yes, it has been 30 years, but I don’t want to dwell on the past- we want to look to the future”, he said.

May stated her delight in visiting Kenya and that she is going away with memories of the continent’s unforgettable “vibrancy and beauty”.  May took this opportunity to dance again awkwardly. Her dancing in South Africa earlier in the week had gone viral on social media platforms across the world.

Will Theresa May ever stick to doing politics?

Zulaikha Abiri is a graduate of Media with Media Practices from Nottingham Trent University and is so start a Master’s in Broadcast Journalism next month to further her interest in the Media.
Her interests include youth, women and children empowerment, especially in under developed and in developing countries. Some of her passions are photography and writing, both creative and factual.

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