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European Super League rocks the boat…again

The call for a European super league just does not seem to go away.

Like a ball that doesn’t lose its bounce, a band that maintains its elasticity, the breakaway league idea is back,

Backed by football’s international governing body Fifa and banking giants JP Morgan, this time it comes as a greater animal.

Why does the argument never stop?

What does a club making big money want? Not just more money, but the ability to dictate how that money is spent. Under the new super league proposals the big clubs would get the best of both worlds.

Beyond the jurisdiction of their national governing bodies (and seemingly UEFA as well), it seems like they’re hoping to create an unattainable group for the elite. It would comprise of 16/18 teams, playing each other twice & then moving into a playoff format with the top 8 sides (similar to the NBA). Matches are predicted to be played midweek, which would be in direct competition with the Champions League, whereas weekend matches would be at odds with domestic league matches.

For the big clubs from the Premier League, it is definitely another power play, maybe it was the plan all along and ‘Project Big Picture’ was the decoy whilst the finances were sourced for the major plan.

A European Super league would most certainly weaken every major league in Europe and the Champions League in one move.

The European Premier League’s will ultimately make the UEFA Champions League obsolete, what’s the Champions League without the champions?

This competition is positioning itself as a threat to proper and fair competition, with the “founding fathers” subject to earn a joining fee potentially in the hundreds of millions. The disparity between these clubs and the remnants of domestic clubs will widen to arguably unassailable distance due to the lack of international appeal deriving from the other clubs in the various respective leagues.

For Liverpool and Manchester United it looks like Big Picture was a smokescreen for what they really wanted.

What’s the odds of it happening and potential consequences?

Fans, coaches and former players alike have stated their disapproval of a super league, with fears of it could destroy the game.

Many more have voiced their displeasure on social media including the likes of Gary Neville and Luis Figo, both former Champions League winners have expressing their concerns at the proposal.

Understandably, Sky Sports pundit Gary Neville was not a fan of the proposal
Tyrone Chambers
Tyrone Chambers is a London-born, Kent-raised Project manager and aspiring Business owner. He holds a BA (Hons) in Global Business Management where he also spent some time studying in Denmark. He is a strongly opinionated sports fanatic who is also a musician. He works with multiple organisations that look to uplift & impact the wider society.

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